Grafting Orange Trees – How to Graft a Tree by T-budding

Grafting Orange Trees – How to Graft a Tree by T-budding


This video shows how to graft an orange tree
using the T-budding technique. The T-bud is commonly used
for grafting orange trees. It is easy and it gives a high success rate. It works well for grafting new fruit trees. I will be grafting to this inexpensive
orange tree that I bought locally at a reputable nursery. It is a common variety that I already have,
but the tree has a suitable rootstock. The soil in the small original container
would dry out too quickly, so I repot the tree. I will be grafting an heirloom
Italian mandarin orange variety called Avana Tardivo. In order to achieve a successful graft
and also to avoid spreading disease, I sterilize my grafting tools with
a 1.5% concentration of chlorine bleach. This is the original graft that
I will be replacing with Avana Tardivo. I will be grafting to the rootstock
slightly below the original graft. First I remove the leaves and thorns
from the rootstock. I cut an upside-down T
into the rootstock. An upright T will also work. The advantage of an upside-down T
is that it can help to keep water out. This may produce better results
in a rainy area. Next I peel the bark back
with the bark lifter on my grafting knife to prepare the rootstock to receive the bud. T-budding must be performed
during a time of year when the tree is actively growing,
allowing the bark to be peeled back. I slice underneath to cut the bud. The back of the bud has wood attached. The wood does not need to be removed. It is important to avoid touching
the cut surfaces of the bud. It is often possible to hold the bud
by the petiole where the leaf was attached. Since the petiole has fallen off,
I pick the bud up with my knife. Next I insert the bud under the bark. I cut off the bottom of
the bud piece that was sticking out. Next I wrap the bud tightly
with vinyl tape, starting below the bud and wrapping up. My step-by-step article at
fruitmentor.com/GraftingOrangeTrees has more information on wrapping material. In order to improve my chances of success,
I will graft a second bud to the rootstock. This way I will succeed
even if one of the bud grafts fails. Citrus cuttings have the potential
to spread tree-killing diseases. It is often not apparent when a tree
is infected with a fatal disease. This makes the source of citrus budwood
for grafting very important. In California where I live we now have
both exotic diseases that kill citrus trees and also the insects
that spread the diseases. The situation is so severe that it is now
against the law in California to graft with backyard citrus cuttings. Hobbyists in California now instead
order their budwood at a nominal cost from the Citrus Clonal Protection Program
or CCPP, a program that exists to provide disease-free budwood
for the grafting of citrus trees. I have made a video that shows how to set
up an account and order citrus budwood. You can click here or visit the link below. The CCPP will ship budwood anywhere in the
world where the local laws allow it. Many citrus growing regions
where it is not allowed have their own disease-free
citrus budwood programs. Information on other programs
is included in the ordering video. Whenever I graft a tree,
I make a label with the variety name and the date. After the grafts are finished,
I move the tree to a shady area for a three week healing period. After the healing period, I unwrap the grafts. Both buds are still green,
an indication of success.
According to apical dominance, natural
hormones from buds higher in the tree will discourage the growth of the grafted buds. To force the grafted buds to grow,
I make a cut halfway through the rootstock and push the top over
so that it is lower than the grafted buds. The timelapse shows five weeks of growth. After a bit more growth,
I remove the top of the rootstock and stake the tree. In order to encourage branching,
I again break apical dominance
by pinching off the terminal buds. Using tested disease-free budwood will
keep deadly diseases from spreading into your yard via infected budwood. However, in locations where deadly diseases
and the insects that spread them are present, a home-propagated tree is still
vulnerable to infection by insects. For this reason it is important to keep
home-propagated citrus trees at home in these locations. For example, at the moment
in California, Texas, and Arizona, the movement of a home-propagated citrus tree
could lead to a devastating outbreak of the tree-killing huanglongbing disease
in a new location. Even a commercially propagated tree is vulnerable
after a few months at home because the insecticides applied by the production nursery
Are washed away when the plant is watered. I have made this video to save citrus trees
all over the world from deadly diseases. You can help by giving this video a “thumbs up”,
by sharing it, and by subscribing
to this YouTube channel. Also be sure to watch my other videos. My complementary ebook with tips
to help you succeed may be downloaded at: fruitmentor.com/GraftingTips I hope that you have enjoyed this video
and have found it helpful. If you have any questions,
please ask below in the comments.

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