From City Life to Cattle Farming | Farmer Stories

From City Life to Cattle Farming | Farmer Stories


I’m Jane Sale from Yougawalla Station. I live here with my husband and two young
children. We part own and manage Yougawalla and Bulka
Station here in the Kimberley. It’s probably one of the most isolated stations
in the north west of Australia. We have a wonderful life out here running
our cattle. I came from the city originally. I mainly made that change because Hayden is
never going to live in the city and I fell in love with him. I love the life. I’ve always had a horse
when I was young. I love riding. I love working with the cattle. I hadn’t done that before I went to the
Northern Territory and started working with some cattle. I started with my own little
poddy herd. Now we’re here and we’ve got about 20,000
head of cattle on the property and um, I don’t know them all by name anymore, but there’s
a few I do and, um, I just love working with them. We’re managing around about 2,500,000 acres
between Yougawalla and Bulka Stations and some Aboriginal adjist country we have, um,
on Bohemian Downs. It’s a huge responsibility. It’s a huge
responsibility for a few people. We practice low stress stock handling here,
which I think most people do on their cattle stations nowadays. It’s about working with the cattle.. helping
them to do what you want them to do, rather than controlling the cattle. The different areas of the land need different
management. There’s not a lot of creek country on Yougawalla.
It’s a lot of desert grasslands. It’s really important to spread the waters
out so they don’t eat too much of a certain area. And to spread the amount of cattle that
you put on each water. In the creek country, we’ve got a project
in association with National Rangelands Management and we’re doing some erosion control on
some areas that the cattle tend to like to hang on the creeks. So we’ve put some banks in that allows the
grasses to break back through the crust and to grow up. They’re also helping us with
some fencing to fence off these areas that allow it to give it that chance to grow back. Since we moved here and started developing
the waters, there’s been a lot more natural birds and wildlife come in. We’re seeing a lot of Rainbow Bee-eaters,
which is good because we need bee’s for our veggie patch… um which we hadn’t seen
before. We get the odd sea bird coming through from
Lake Gregory to our south. There’s a lot more kangaroos. We’re starting to see a
few emu’s which we’ve never seen before. And they just didn’t have that pathway between
waters before we were here I suppose, to be able to live out here. We think it’s so important to put your infrastructure
in and have minimal impact. It’s really important that we keep the natural
environment here as much as possible. We’re not developing this to overrun it. We’re
developing it to sustain itself and we um, want it to be able to do that and continue
to do that for generations to come.

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